Four Ways to Keep Your Food Safe

“Food cooked with passion and served with love tastes divine” is an old English proverb. I assure you, it still holds true today! Every foodie, like you and I, is aware that the right combination of spices and natural, fresh ingredients is the heart of any good recipe. However, when we cook food, we might overlook a component that is even more critical and, more often than not, compromises the recipe’s core. Yes, I’m referring to food hygiene and safety. One must be exceptionally cautious while dealing with food and keep up with the most significant level of cleanliness and food handling in our kitchen and home.

At any stage, including harvesting, processing, preparation, storage, and transportation, food contamination can occur. Where low hygiene standards are used, foodborne diseases are frequently prevalent. The World Health Organization’s data show that nearly one in ten people get sick each year from foodborne illness. Children, in particular, can die from these diseases.

When handling food, there are a few basic rules to follow:

Clean: Regularly clean surfaces and hands.
Separate: Avoid crossing over.
Cook: Get the temperature just right.
Chill: Refrigerate immediately.

Clean: Regularly clean surfaces and hands.

Before touching food, one must thoroughly wash their hands with soap. This prevents germs from getting into the food from your hands. Before using any fruit or vegetable, it is necessary to wash it in cold water. The most important surfaces and counters in the kitchen can contaminate food if they are dirty. Both these places and the equipment used to prepare food need to be thoroughly cleaned.

Cooking and handling food should be avoided if you have a cold or the flu. A person should avoid the workplace if they show signs of jaundice, vomiting, or diarrhea. Additionally, they should not be allowed to prepare or serve food if they have a fever and a sore throat. This is troubling because it raises the possibility that they could have spread disease to those who ate at their establishments. “Foodborne pathogens such as Norovirus, Hepatitis A, and Shigella frequently are spread by sick workers to restaurant patrons through the food,” says extension food safety specialist Martin Bucknavage. These suggestions are applicable to individuals who cook for their families, work in child care facilities, or care for the elderly, as well as foodservice and retail establishments. All age groups should be encouraged to use tissue paper and hand sanitizers.

Separate: Avoid crossing over.

When storing and preparing food, keep raw and cooked foods separate to prevent cross-contamination. In order to prevent juices from contaminating food on lower shelves, raw meats and poultry should be stored in the bottom of the refrigerator in covered containers. Cooked meat should not be placed back on the raw meat’s plate.

Cook: Get the temperature just right.

Cooking meat, seafood, and poultry should be done with care if you eat them. Before eating, they should be thoroughly cooked at the appropriate temperatures. Put a skewer in the middle of the meat and check to see if there is any pink meat to confirm. Clear juices are required. Those are indications of properly cooked meat. Consuming raw meat can result in food poisoning.

In the beyond couple of years microwaves are being utilized in our kitchens to prepare and warm food. Food wrapping paper of a high quality can be used to protect your food from drying out during reheating. Check to see that steam is coming out of the reheated food and that it is piping hot. This indicates that you have eliminated the risk of pathogens like bacteria.

Chill: Refrigerate immediately.

Wrap your raw food in food wrapping paper that can absorb moisture, stop juices from dripping, and keep it at a temperature below 5 degrees Celsius if you plan to store it in the refrigerator. You can assist with guarding your family from food contamination at home. Bacteria that cause illness grow more slowly in cold temperatures. Therefore, it is critical to chill food appropriately and promptly. Within two hours, store foods that are likely to spoil.
Numerous food-borne illnesses can be avoided through healthy and sanitary eating habits. These behaviors should become part of your daily routine and be taught to children as well. It’s the little things that make a big difference to your overall health and well-being.

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